Baker Mayfield was better when Jarvis Landry wasn’t on the field

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This week Kevin Cole, Director of Data & Analytics at RotoGrinders discussed some of the fascinating research he is doing regarding the impact on passing yards per attempt, when individual players are/aren’t on the field.

While a guest on the Paul Brown Podcast, Kevin discussed some of the early findings from this research regarding Browns players. There was a six-yard improvement to Baker Mayfield’s passing yards per attempt when Jarvis Landry was on the sideline.

Kevin added that when the Browns moved from Desmond Harrison to Greg Robinson, this resulted in an improvement of two passing yards per attempt.

With the numbers showing that having Landry on the field being three times worse than having Desmond Harrison on the field, we do have to wonder why he is being paid over $14 million this season and if it will be his final season in Cleveland?

Landry had 81 catches for 976 yards and four touchdowns in 2018 but was targeted 149 times leaving him with a catch percentage of 54.4%, the worst of his five-year career.

During the first eight games of the season, the offense treated him like a number one wide receiver, something he clearly isn’t but once Freddie Kitchens took over the offense during the final eight games, the offense evolved getting Rashard Higgins, David Njoku, Antonio Callaway, Nick Chubb, Duke Johnson and Breshad Perriman all involved in the passing attack.

The biggest boost by any one player to Baker Mayfield’s passing yards per attempt was when Breshad Perriman was on the field. Perriman’s 21.3 yards per reception was a big spark to the offensive success down the stretch.

You can check out the full episode on iTunes or Podbean, where several other discussions took place. It is also available on all major podcast sites.

Jack Duffin is the co-host of the Paul Brown Podcast, a Daily Browns Podcast based out of London, England. You can follow him on Twitter @JackDuffin.

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